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Osprey Rescue

Tommy Aprea - Windsong Osprey Nest

Tip:  If the nest is empty, use the red scroll bar to rewind the stream up to 12 hours

June 15th, 2020: Two eggs in the nest. Mostly sunny this week.

Please be advised that nature can be brutal – viewer discretion is advised.
Best viewed with Google Chrome.

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Special Thanks to Tommy and Christina: George & Gracie’s Landlords

Belle’s Journey

Written by Dr. Rob Bierregaard & Illustrated by Kate Garchinsky

Take flight with Belle, an osprey born on Martha’s Vineyard as she learns to fly and migrates for the first time to Brazil and back–a journey of more than 8,000 miles.

Click HERE for more information!

IMPORTANT: Messages from osprey experts

Rob Bierregaard July 1, 2015 at 7:24 am
I haven’t seen the little guy yet this morning, but I would be very surprised if he survived the night. That sure was tough to watch yesterday, but that whole process is as much a part of the essence of being an Osprey as is eating a fish. It’s part of the life of Ospreys that was rarely seen before we started putting cameras in nests. As hard as it is, we should not label the behavior as mean or cruel. Being mean or cruel implies that there is intent to do harm just for harm’s sake. Those young were responding to a set of stimuli (very little food being delivered to the nest and the presence of a very small young) in a way that evolution has hard-wired into them. It helps ensure their survival. Nature is not cruel. It is harsh, unforgiving, and often random (had the little guy been born 1st, he would have been just as aggressive as was his sibling), but not cruel or mean.

4818eecc88292926c58414a82c884c71Paul Henry ospreyzone July 1, 2015 at 8:17 am
Thanks Rob for bringing your knowledge and experience to help us all gain perspective here. We are all saddened by the events that unfolded before our eyes and it’s only natural for all of us to feel and express our emotions appropriately. There have been many issues pertaining to intervention which have been discussed amongst us all. There is no doubt in my mind that the right decision was made, to let nature take it’s course. By the way, that doesn’t equate to heartless, on the contrary, nobody feels worse about this then the apparent decision makers. I say apparent, because when all was said and done, and all the issues were properly weighed, there really weren’t any other options. It was clearly pointed out, by experts, that intervening at this stage could have spooked the whole nest to the point of losing all the young. If the little one was saved, and nursed back to health, what kind of a life would it have had, perhaps caged up in a zoo. I remember when I was younger I saw a golden eagle in captivity, caged behind a wire mesh. I could practically see it’s tears. As far as placing the little one in another nest, such a low probability of success would never have justified the possibility of spooking the nest. There’s a piece of me, however heavy hearted, that believes that perhaps it is better to be born free and die free. We mourn for the little one as we marvel at the wonders of nature.

Reprinted with the permission of John W. Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Hello Paul,

Thanks for your query, and you have my admiration for persevering. We know very well how tough your job is, including dealing with an anxious public.

Our policy with our Bird Cams project is essentially “just say no” to pleas for interference. The behavior you are witnessing – while seemingly cruel and heartless to us – is natural for many kinds of birds, especially those that feed on variable, unpredictable food supplies. The little nestling does have a chance to survive, but if it does not then that result was “meant to be” by the nature of Osprey breeding strategy. The wonderful things about these nest cameras also sometimes yield the difficult things for us to watch. As you might know, we actually post a “siblicide alert” on some of our cams where we suspect the possibility exists.

I’m copying your note to Charles Eldermire, project leader for our Bird Cams. He may have some additional comments, and he would be the one to ask if we might be able to use your stored files for biological analysis.

Best wishes, and good luck,

John W. Fitzpatrick

Director, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

In addition, Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of Ornithology Writes:

It’s also important to acknowledge that intervening can also cause problems of its own—depending on the ages of the birds in the nest, disturbing them can trigger an early fledge. We have restricted the scenarios in which we would even consider intervening to injuries or dangers that are explicitly human-derived. For example, 3 or 4 years ago we were alerted by viewers that one of the osprey chicks at the Hellgate Osprey nest was entangled in monofilament line. We consulted with our partners there (wildlife biologists, raptor researchers, raptor rehabbers) to determine if the monofilament was an issue, and if intervening was both likely to solve the issue AND not have bad effects on the other nestlings. In the end, a quick trip to the nest was scheduled via a bucket truck, the monofilament was removed, and the nestlings all eventually fledged. In that case, all of the permits were already in hand to be studying the ospreys, and we had already discussed how to approach issues in the nest.

Good luck to the young one—hope it all turns out well.

charles.

*******************
Charles Eldermire
Bird Cams Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Paul,

I’ve been to your site—great cam! And I noticed the runt in the nest. This is just normal Osprey reproduction. It happens all the time and you should not intervene. It’s tough to watch, but it’s how nature works. Ospreys almost always lay 3 eggs and on average fledge between 1 and 1.5 young each year. They stagger the hatch so there is a spread of ages in the young. That way, if food is short, the first-hatched (and therefore largest) will get enough food to survive while the smaller nest mates do not. If all three young were the same size and there was only enough food for 1 young, none of the young would get enough food and they would all die. If there’s lots of food, the smallest will eventually get fed and can survive. These nest cams can show some gut-wrenching scenes. The most infamous perhaps was one of the very first Osprey cams (on Long Island somewhere), where the smallest young died. One of the adults carried it out of the nest and after several minutes flew back into the nest and fed it to the other young. Waste-not-want-not at its goriest. At Hog Island up in Maine just last week a Bald Eagle came in and took the young out of the nest. Last year at another nest, cameras documented a Great-horned Owl taking young Ospreys out of a nest in NJ or MD. All of these things have been going on for millions of years and Ospreys are doing fine.

Rob Bierregaard
Academy of Natural Sciences
Drexel University
http://www.ospreytrax.com

    44,119 Comments

    1. Betsy July 16, 2016 at 12:59 am - Reply

      7/15/2016 Fish Count Total

      • Karen DeLong July 16, 2016 at 11:46 am - Reply

        How in the world do you take, post and then do the fishy thing over them? That’s just amazing to me. I am not a computer geek what so ever. So I envy anyone who can do these things……

        • Betsy July 16, 2016 at 1:58 pm - Reply

          I used MS Paint …cropped the fish and George’s foot from his catches, lined them up, found a cartoon pic of a fish which I then put on top of George’s catches after they were all lined up (set transparent on the fish so it was clear) and saved!! 😀 😀

          • Betsy July 16, 2016 at 1:59 pm - Reply

            It somehow posted before I was done attaching my picture!!

      • Shar July 16, 2016 at 12:48 pm - Reply

        Betsy, thank you so much for posting the fish count with pictures! I live on the west coast and miss the early morning feeds, even though I can ‘rewind’ sometimes I don’t have time to do that……………..as with everyone watching this nest, I am always rooting for Trey to get fed, so it’s great to see there were lots of fish coming in today! Thanks again.

      • Marilyn July 16, 2016 at 1:22 pm - Reply

        Betsy, how cute that post is that you put up about the times that the fish were brought in. Love it.

      • PattyK July 16, 2016 at 2:43 pm - Reply

        Awesome! You certainly are photo & video talented! Thank you!!

      • Donna W July 17, 2016 at 12:14 am - Reply

        Betsy, thanks so much for taking your time to create the wonderful collage of the fish deliveries! It looks fantastic with the fish overlay! Just love it!

      • BirdRJSviewer16 July 17, 2016 at 12:47 am - Reply

        Cool

    2. Marlene July 15, 2016 at 9:41 pm - Reply

      Thanks to all who are keeping track of the fish that George brought in. This was another busy day and I did not get to log on until around 8:30 p.m. I scrolled back and saw a whole fish delivery at 17:23. Looks like #3 was first on the scene to eat, followed by #2, #1, #2, and then again #3. I think they are all full. It’s so nice to see that #3’s neck feathers are growing back. Maybe #1 is becoming more accepting of her because there is plenty of food, thank goodness. Hope everyone has a nice weekend.

    3. Rose Petejan July 15, 2016 at 9:29 pm - Reply

      June 15 9:29 p.m. Thank you to everyone that posts fish deliveries and pictures. I am grateful for the information.

    4. rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 9:29 pm - Reply

      7-15-16 Reply Jp(K) Thank you !

    5. GinaM July 15, 2016 at 9:15 pm - Reply

      If there was more of a wind tonight, #1 would have been successful in his hovering attempt. He really was trying. They grow up so fast!!

    6. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 8:37 pm - Reply

      Maybe this will help. When I see the back or side of chick #2, I think of this ’80″s hairstyle:

      • Betsy July 16, 2016 at 1:15 am - Reply

        This is the back of chick #1’s head – see how there isn’t as much dark feathering on the top/sides as chick #2; and the patch of dark feathering above the neck is wider and a little shorter in chick #2. And the strip of dark feathers (like a bridge) between the dark feathers on top of the head and the patch of dark feathers above the neck is wider in chick #2.

      • Paula July 16, 2016 at 12:19 pm - Reply

        This is a brilliant comparison Betsy. It will really help to tell them apart. I had to laugh out loud though!
        Thank you

        • Paula July 16, 2016 at 12:21 pm - Reply

          Sorry, this was supposed to post for the #2 comparison.

      • Marilyn July 16, 2016 at 1:22 pm - Reply

        lol

      • Betsy July 16, 2016 at 2:19 pm - Reply

        Paula and Marilyn and all: When their head feathers were first growing out, all I could think was Tina Turner and Rod Stewart!!

    7. DarDar July 15, 2016 at 8:27 pm - Reply

      6:00 pm Fri the little ate so much not another bite would fit in his mouth. Completely ignored by the biggies. And the video is much clearer. Yeah!

    8. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:21 pm - Reply

      I just glanced up in the middle of one of these stretches and was shocked to realize that is one of our BABIES! Look at those legs! I feel like a mom at jr. high graduation!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:41 pm - Reply

        There was hopping with this one….

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:42 pm - Reply

          At least we know this is Trey!

    9. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 8:20 pm - Reply

      In the picture in your July 15, 2016 at 1:17 pm, Carol, the chick standing there is Uno. In the video the chick closest to the camera is Dos who is ack ack acking!! After George flew up to the perch, the chicks moseyed over to Gracie, but then chick #2 (on the left as the video ends) did a uey and headed to the (our) right side of the nest to “stand” there with just his/her tail feathers in view.

      https://youtu.be/r_x0KWoxbSs

      • CarolV July 16, 2016 at 3:50 pm - Reply

        I thought it was 2 but figured I was wrong again, since 1 is the sneezer…thanks! That would be why I cringe when I id these guys. 50-50 chance means bad odds for me!

        • CarolV July 16, 2016 at 9:32 pm - Reply

          And thank you…I believe that was on my wish list……

    10. Robin July 15, 2016 at 8:06 pm - Reply

      Yay! It seems we have reached a point in their development where they are no longer going to peck each other – hope I am correct in saying this.

    11. rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 7:56 pm - Reply

      7-15-16 pm ATTENTION All Osprey Followers-

      I cant thank you enough for all the kind words and appreciation also the thanks yous that I have received over the past 2 days. This fills my heart with joy and you cant imaging how much love I feel right now.

      I apologize if this seems a bit in personal but I dont want to fill up the comment page with all the Thank Yous I would have to post individually.

      I have been watching and reading comments and only posted a couple times today.

      I noticed and read Betsy has been doing a fish count with pictures today and she has done a wonderful job. Maybe she will continue to do so since she seems to be enjoying time off from making videos.

      Betsy, you must be feeling joy in your heart too since I see you have giving us back all the videos that you made. 🙂

      Once again you have made me feel special and I truly appreciate it. Osprey Zone is my home away from home !

      Love My Osprey Family and Followers!

      pic Geo in front Gracie 4-9-2016

    12. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:54 pm - Reply

      I find it hard to imagine these birds will be flying in 2 weeks or less. But that’s the time plan….too late to change my guesses.

    13. rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 7:14 pm - Reply

      7-15-16 Betsy I see your videos are back up,I guess after everyone commented and you took a night off you realized how much we do appreciate your videos and that is wonderful!

      Betsy, I see you have done a wonderful job at the fish count today so I hope you continue to do so since so many people responded to me and showed great appreciation and requested I continue to do. Love your pics a little big but love them. 🙂

      Pic is for you I know you want me to change my pic back to this feather duster maybe I will just for you!

      • Betsy July 16, 2016 at 8:21 am - Reply

        You know I love Gracie and you know I really love the feather duster picture!! But I don’t see the change next to your picture yet!!

    14. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 6:38 pm - Reply

      THANK YOU, BETSY

    15. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 5:31 pm - Reply

      5:18pm- George brings home Moby Dick for dinner! That should last a little while! And Trey even got in for first dibs…yummy guts!
      Poor little Trey has like one long feather on the back of her head…but she wears it with style!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 5:34 pm - Reply

        Had about 8-9 mins. before she stepped aside.

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 5:51 pm - Reply

          @5:33 on the tape…whatever that fish is, it has a hard bone-like structure that Gracie is having a hard time working through…

          • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 5:59 pm - Reply

            Gill cover? She finally worked around it and pulled it out.

            • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 6:05 pm

              Sit down service

            • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 6:16 pm

              And Trey got more and walked away, leaving some for Gracie to enjoy in peace….YAY

    16. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 5:28 pm - Reply

      Now, Moby here deserves a video!!

      Fish #8 at 5:18 pm

    17. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 5:07 pm - Reply

      Kathleen: re if chick #1 has the bird flu
      Renowned osprey expert Dr. Rob Bierregaard or another qualified ornithologist or an avian veterinarian would be the best qualified people to answer medical questions such as if a bird/osprey has the bird flu.

      Kathleen July 15, 2016 at 1:39 pm – Reply
      rjoneal – What do you think?
      Could #1 bird be suffering from a Bird Flu? I really don’t like #1 but I can’t help but feel sorry for him/her. If it is the flakes from the feather shafts, his nest mates seem to be immune.

      • Kathleen July 16, 2016 at 10:46 am - Reply

        Hi Betsy – I bet the Ornithologists or a vet would be able to answer my ? – but I kinda feel that rjoneal is someone that I can ‘speak’ easily with and he is so knowledgable. No disrespect to the learned individuals out there.

        • Rjoneal July 16, 2016 at 8:08 pm - Reply

          7-16-16 reply- thank you for feeling you can ask me anything.
          FYI- I know you wouldn’t know this unless you have read a lot of my previous post mostly last year but I am a female who lives in Florida . One osprey nest in my backyard on the lake and one at local shopping center that I watch all your long. I love all birds and belong to Audubon and a couple other associations.
          I have hawks, egrets, eagels, ospreys you name it we pretty much have every kind of bird right here in my own backyard. We can’t forget the hummingbirds the Redbird’s Blue Jays and so on. Because I have a lake in my backyard and live couple miles from the Atlantic Ocean in a couple miles from the St. Johns River we have every kind of bird you can think of and ospreys are just everywhere.
          I am all about getting as much education on our ospreys as possible. I have read a lot of books and have a lot of books to read many of our Osprey zone viewers have listed out books that Are good to read.

    18. Marilyn July 15, 2016 at 4:25 pm - Reply

      Looks like there is a little breeze right now at 4:25 pm. Thanks goodness, because it was pretty hot & humid here today.

    19. birdRJSviewer16 July 15, 2016 at 3:55 pm - Reply

      Very hot 90s day temp now and coming up. Hope they have many fish to stay hydrated 🙂

    20. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 2:55 pm - Reply

      Fish #7 at 14:27

    21. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 2:40 pm - Reply

      OK Somehow posted original 2:32pm fish arrival below, I think as a reply. Here’s another one.

    22. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 2:38 pm - Reply

      Fish #6 at 12:45 pm

    23. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 2:20 pm - Reply

      Fish #5 at 11:59 am

    24. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 2:15 pm - Reply

      OK- Throwing it out there..inspired by Kathleen S’s ambition……..

      FIRST FLIGHT- fully leaving nest
      #1-ambitious Uno- July23
      #2-cautious Dos- July26
      #3-little Trey-August3

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 2:18 pm - Reply

        I should have said 24th for someone…my Mom’s b’day…But no changing…

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 8:38 pm - Reply

        Be interesting to see how close or right on you are!

    25. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 2:06 pm - Reply

      Gracie spreads her wings

      • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 2:07 pm - Reply

        Wings.

      • Twinsmom July 15, 2016 at 2:59 pm - Reply

        Great picture capture! Their wings are amazing.

      • GinaM July 15, 2016 at 6:41 pm - Reply

        Now THAT’S a mombrella! Great photo!

    26. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 1:44 pm - Reply

      Chick #1 still wants to be under Gracie’s mombrella.

      • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 1:45 pm - Reply

        Chick #1 and Gracie.

        • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 1:46 pm - Reply

          Chick #1 and Gracie.

          • Margaret July 15, 2016 at 6:01 pm - Reply

            Betsy…. Absolutely fabulous photos!!!!

        • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 8:34 pm - Reply

          Such a sweet picture!

    27. Dorothy July 15, 2016 at 1:42 pm - Reply

      Hi, I have asked this before but never got a reply. For next season, would it be possible to move the camera up higher so the entire nest can be observed? It would be great to eliminate the dead zones. Thanks!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 2:22 pm - Reply

        That will be up to admin. They had the nest down over winter to shorten tower from 80′ to 60′ and chose to leave it mounted as is. Many people like it there. The poop solution worked well but has hit a glitch. It can’t have been an easy undertaking.

        • Dorothy July 16, 2016 at 10:59 am - Reply

          It would just be nice to be able to see the entire nest and not have the dead zone to the right side.

    28. Kathleen July 15, 2016 at 1:39 pm - Reply

      rjoneal – What do you think?
      Could #1 bird be suffering from a Bird Flu? I really don’t like #1 but I can’t help but feel sorry for him/her. If it is the flakes from the feather shafts, his nest mates seem to be immune.

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 6:23 pm - Reply

        Maybe like allergies, some are more susceptible? He was sneezing like crazy today. And even seemed somewhat subdued (to Trey’s benefit)

      • GinaM July 15, 2016 at 6:42 pm - Reply

        Last year there was a lot of sneezing too. I think it is something they go through.

      • Robin July 15, 2016 at 8:26 pm - Reply

        I think it’s Chick #2 doing all the sneezing, no?

      • rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 9:08 pm - Reply

        7-15-16 Reply Kathleen-

        Avian Influenza in Birds

        Avian influenza refers to infection of birds with avian influenza Type A viruses. These viruses occur naturally among wild aquatic birds worldwide and can infect domestic poultry and other bird and animal species. Wild aquatic birds can be infected with avian influenza A viruses in their intestines and respiratory tract, but usually do not get sick. However, avian influenza A viruses are very contagious among birds and some of these viruses can sicken and even kill certain domesticated bird species including chickens, ducks, and turkeys.
        Infected birds can shed avian influenza A viruses in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces. Susceptible birds become infected when they have contact with the virus as it is shed by infected birds. They also can become infected through contact with surfaces that are contaminated with virus from infected birds.
        Avian influenza A viruses are classified into the following two categories: low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) A viruses, and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A viruses. The categories refer to molecular characteristics of a virus and the virus’ ability to cause disease and mortality in chickens in a laboratory setting[2.5 MB, 64 pages]. Infection of poultry with LPAI viruses may cause no disease or mild illness (such as ruffled feathers and a drop in egg production) and may not be detected. Infection of poultry with HPAI viruses can cause severe disease with high mortality. Both HPAI and LPAI viruses can spread rapidly through poultry flocks. However, some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness.
        In December 2014, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 viruses in both domestic and wild birds in the United States. No human infections with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally at this time, however, similar viruses have infected people. It’s possible that human infections with these viruses may occur. While human infections are possible, infection with avian influenza viruses in general are rare and – when they occur – these viruses have not spread easily to other people. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in U.S. birds and poultry to be low at this time, but has developed interim guidance on testing and prophylaxis. More information about detections of HPAI in U.S. birds is available through a link on the USDA website.
        For more information visit the USDA avian influenza page and the USDA APHIS avian influenza page. For more information on avian influenza and wild birds, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center website.

        Avian Influenza in Wild Birds
        Avian influenza A viruses have been isolated from more than 100 different species of wild birds. Most of these viruses have been LPAI viruses. The majority of the wild birds from which these viruses have been recovered represent gulls, terns and shorebirds or waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans. These wild birds are often viewed as reservoirs (hosts) for avian influenza A viruses.
        Avian Influenza in Poultry (Domesticated Birds)
        Domesticated birds (chickens, turkeys, etc.) may become infected with avian influenza A viruses through direct contact with infected waterfowl or other infected poultry, or through contact with surfaces that have been contaminated with the viruses.
        Infection of poultry with LPAI viruses may cause no disease or mild illness and may only cause mild signs (such as ruffled feathers and a drop in egg production) and may not be detected. Infection of poultry with HPAI viruses can cause severe disease with high mortality. Both HPAI and LPAI viruses can spread rapidly through flocks of poultry. HPAI virus infection in poultry (such as with HPAI H5 or HPAI H7 viruses) can cause disease that affects multiple internal organs with mortality up to 90% to 100%, often within 48 hours. Some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness.
        CDC, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), World Health Organization (WHO), World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) conduct routine surveillance to monitor influenza viruses for changes that may have implications for animal and public health. CDC and WHO surveillance efforts are focused on human health. FAO and OIE are concerned with issues affecting animals, food and agriculture.
        Avian influenza outbreaks are of concern in domesticated birds for several reasons:
        • the potential for low pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses to evolve into highly pathogenic viruses
        • the potential for rapid spread and significant illness and death among poultry during outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza
        • the economic impact and trade restrictions from a highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak
        • the possibility that avian influenza A viruses could be transmitted to humans
        When H5 or H7 avian influenza outbreaks occur in poultry, depopulation (or culling, also called “stamping out”) of infected flocks is usually carried out. In addition surveillance of flocks that are nearby or linked to the infected flock(s), and quarantine of exposed flocks with culling if disease is detected, are the preferred control and e

        http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/avian-in-birds.htm
        ________________________________________________
        I also found this below about bird flu

        Name Date Message
        Tiger 10/15/05 01:09 pm Does anyone now if ospreys are suscepible to bird flu?

        Celeste 10/15/05 03:53 pm This week I was trying to learn more about this avian flu and I wanted to know if migratory wildbirds, such as osprey could also get this disease. . This afternoon I heard there were more cases of the flu supposedly transmitted by migratory birds, though they didn’t mention what bird, I suspect they are water birds, (geese and ducks), used for eating purposes. So far I have only been able to find the following–

        http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/research/WHB/WHB_04_01.html
        An excerpt…….
        “While it is common for wild birds, particularly waterbirds, to carry strains of avian influenza virus, there is little evidence that the new virulent H5N1 virus strain is affecting wild bird populations, or that wild birds are able to spread this Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus. Thus far in 2004, there is a report that out of 6,000 wild birds tested in Hong Kong, one peregrine falcon was positive for the H5N1 strain. It is not known how the bird became infected and reports are not clear if the bird actually died from the disease”

        The article also states historically migratory wild waterbirds rarely cause disease, which contradicts today’s news report.
        Marie 10/15/05 04:02 pm Tiger, Bird life international have indicated that most bird FLU is BORN of the choked and appalling conditions that domestic chickens live under. Transportation of infected chickens, and infected birds in the exotic bird trade will further increase and spread this around. ONCE again, I believe, it is Man’s determination to cut corners , to MASS PRODUCE for PROFIT that causes much of the world’s ills. Look at the mad cow EXAMPLES. Unfortunately, the Humans that are in close contact with the production and slaughter of chickens are most vulnerable and are the ones that become infected and transmit. Close encounters or wild birds to chickens on-the-run, ie those in Asia that are allowed to feed in the open areas( Lucky chickens) that wild birds forage along side certainly could cause some wild birds to become infected ( virus mutations)…mostly likely waterfowl, but generally not long distance migrants. However 13-19%( if I remember rightly) of the Bar- headed goose was whipped out this past winter I believe from bird flu and they are long distant migrants! They certainly originated from Asia flying over the Himalayas to winter in India….I guess anything is possible. Even if the ospreys aren’t carriers the Hysteria and all the bad press about Avian Fu will certainly make many birds vulnerable to poisoning, and slaughter from anxious HUMANS, especially in their wintering grounds. Funny thing is, the birds will get blamed when really it is all to do with
        ” Humans ”and their farming/production practices. Are confined chickens being fed with pellets of food that contain their own kind, as well as antibiotics, and growth hormone? Just as the Mad cow disease surfaced a few years ago, we all discovered what ‘BEEF’ were being fed. Appalling! Cows…like chickens are are grain/grass eaters. Who ever thought that animals would do well eating their own kind? What on earth happened to the science in this issue? We certainly as a race need to wake up and take note or else it will be too late.
        We now have the same issues here with Salmon fish farms. So sad.
        You can read all about the Avian Flu in the URL below. What are we eating these days is a real issue for me!
        http://www.birdlife.org/news/news/2005/10/avian_flu.html

        cathy 10/16/05 02:36 am Thanks, Marie for the well-expressed views. It makes me sad to see the slaughter of poultry to reduce bird flu. I also think of the people for whom these birds represents a livelihood. As you say, the everyday practices to raise meat for societies huge appetite seems appalling. What has concerned me about bird flu is that shooting or otherwise killing migratory birds might become acceptable as a “preventative” measure. Many of these methods might be indiscriminate – ducks or ospreys or cranes or storks. I guess we will learn what happens and hope the birds return as they have in recent years.
        Tom I 10/16/05 08:44 am For facts on bird flu, the CDC website has a FAQ regarding it at:
        http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/gen-info/facts.htm

        Bird flu’s originate in the wild and become a problem when domestic birds pick it up, becasue they are kept in close proximity. This virus is mainly circulating in Asian villages where the domestic chickens/ducks are often free ranging for the most part. Problem is that they (people) let the birds in their homes and such making contact with humans likely. The main threat is if someone has flu and bird flu at the same time, if this occurs the two viruses can mix and has the potential to create new strain, much like in 1918.
        ___________________

        Or are you thinking this due to the sneezing if so here is what Betsy has posted several times since several times people kept asking the same question.
        July 11, 2016 at 7:16 pm – Reply
        To Wendy, MD (again), and any one else with the same question/concern about the chick(s) sneezing:
        MD: Yes, they all* have been sneezing. Chick #1 has been frequently sneezing for a little over two weeks now and chick #2 and chick#3 and Gracie occasionally sneeze (*I have not heard George sneeze, yet). Maltiegirl posted very interesting information in reply to a similar question:
        Original question:
        Karen DeLong July 9, 2016 at 5:19 pm
        Ok…. Question for anyone who might know. Can birds get allergies? I noticed one just sneezing up a storm. I couldn’t tell which number it was. (1718pm)
        Reply:
        Maltiegirl July 9, 2016 at 8:01 pm
        Hi Karen, I saw this on the Charlo Montana Osprey site regarding sneezing!
        ” Lots of preening as those feathers are really developing. Once the feathers have developed they burst through the sheath protecting them. They contain blood vessels that nourish the growing feather, thus the name blood feather, or pin feather. The feather is rolled inside of these tubes to protect it while growing. The protective tubes flake and fall away on their own or while the bird is preening. Through this time you will often hear the Ospreys sneeze as the powdery flakes fall away and become airborne. “!

        I hope this helps you

        • Kathleen July 16, 2016 at 10:55 am - Reply

          rjoneal – Thank you for your thoughtful answer to my query. I want you to know that I deeply appreciate your time and effort in satisfying my curiosity.

    29. Kelly July 15, 2016 at 1:14 pm - Reply

      Betsy, I normally watch and read comments. Very seldom do I post. I can prob answer for a lot of us, that don’t get to watch all the time., your videos are greatly appreciated, and hopefully you would consider, when our babies take their first flights, doing a video of each, if at that point we can still tell them apart? I’m sure quite a bunch of us, will miss it, and would mean so much, since we are all vested! Thks so much!!!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:27 pm - Reply

        Second and third that!!!!!!!!!!!!

    30. Jai July 15, 2016 at 12:52 pm - Reply

      Think one should be named sneezie 🙂

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:28 pm - Reply

        And Trey sounds like a seagull

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:48 pm - Reply

          Apologies to Trey..went back to 12:46 and saw one of sibs making the “ack,ack” noise….
          Pretty sure this is the acker…Is that Uno? Which would make sense, since Betsy says he’s the main sneezer……adenoids? JK

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 1:54 pm - Reply

        Good one!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 2:32 pm - Reply

        And who’s that handsome airman with his yummy fish? Our George !

    31. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 12:50 pm - Reply

      12:45pm-NEXT ! Anyone still hungry?
      I like the effect of wings in motion…..

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 12:53 pm - Reply

        The crowd presses in …….and George heads upstairs…

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:01 pm - Reply

          It was kind of funny as the chicks moved in, in slow motion sort of. ………….Too bad we can’t see it on video……………….{;-)

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:17 pm - Reply

          Gracie sprouting wings-other wings….
          Trey ate for a good 15 mins. The biggies were busy watching something on camera side of nest. Uno(I think0 pushed his way in between Mom and Trey; Trey came over to complain and hang ouy with other sib.

      • Karen July 15, 2016 at 1:42 pm - Reply

        George is such a great hunter. He knows to bring in large fish most of the time to feed the whole brood. This one Grace positioned herself to make it clear this is a feeding that Trey gets first dibs on!!

    32. Kathleen S July 15, 2016 at 12:27 pm - Reply

      I looked at some fledge data from 36 chicks, and made a little list of nests and projected fledge dates based on the most common fledge ages.. The last week of July is going to be fledge mania

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:25 pm - Reply

        WAY ambitious!You go, girl!

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 2:12 pm - Reply

        Lotta work there and you’re right. Gonna be a lot of wings flapping during that time frame!

    33. Dorothy July 15, 2016 at 12:23 pm - Reply

      Here is an interesting/funny video of banding the osprey on Hog Island, ME.

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:23 pm - Reply

        Really interesting…thanks! And everyone cheers for poop! Except on the lens…..

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 2:16 pm - Reply

        Thanks for posting this interesting video!

      • Helen July 15, 2016 at 7:43 pm - Reply

        Thank you,

    34. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 12:13 pm - Reply

      11:59:39amEDT- Is that the noon whistle? No, just Gracie & Co. piping in the lunch menu. George brought something with spiky back fins. Gracie took it upfront(by camera) and had a long chat with George before he left. And is now feeding kids in no-see-um corner..

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 12:14 pm - Reply

        That wing in upper right is Gracie bustling thru the kids-who don’t move, of course!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 12:26 pm - Reply

        PORGY? anyone who knows? Best shot I could get…..

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:02 pm - Reply

          Yeah…I know…useless for i.d.

    35. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 12:04 pm - Reply

      Reply to CarolV
      This is chick #1

      CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:51 am – Reply
      8:28a.m. Our Biggies rarely have close-ups, except for ID purposes. Admitted favoritism…..
      I think I know who this is, but I’m unreliable in better circumstances. SSOOOOOOOOOOOOO——A Biggie

    36. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 11:38 am - Reply

      Reply to CarolV
      It was chick #1

      CarolV July 15, 2016 at 9:20 am – Reply
      A Biggie tried self feeding..you can figure out who…..

    37. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 11:28 am - Reply

      BETSY…I’m glad to see you’re posting. And L.C. and Louise posting pictures, too. I went a little crazy this morning…..I don’t do videos…

      Just know that I appreciate every video, every picture, every comment-positive, negative, all in between. Every opinion (whether I agree or not) every viewpoint (ditto), every bit of information shared by the viewers. Some I take with a grain of salt, some I try to read in “another voice”, thinking I may be mis-interpreting. We just don’t thank others enough.

      I think Jp(K) said it the best(to Rjoneal, I believe)-(paraphrased) If you want to, do it, do it. Don’t care what others think.

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 11:48 am - Reply

        Mid to high 80s out here today..cooler on my side because of ocean. Looks like more of the same all weekend. Humidity is high, too, today.

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 2:06 pm - Reply

        Me too Betsy and Rjoneal!

      • JP(K) July 15, 2016 at 9:51 pm - Reply

        Yup. Also, Betsy, don’t feel you need to document everything. Whatever you want to do is appreciated, if it starts to feel more like a duty, don’t feel obligated. Many appreciate the work you and others put into the vids and fish counts, the web and chatrooms are not like face to face socializing. One day you will get 100 thanks, another day not a peep, depending on lots of things, moderators schedules, people’s schedules, etc. You can’t take it personal. And don’t listen to people complaining. Just do what makes you happy. If moderators don’t approve of anything your doing they will tell you, or won’t post it.

    38. Maryann July 15, 2016 at 11:12 am - Reply

      Uno (Joe Frazier) – staring right at the camera, bobbing and weaving – probably trying to figure out how to take a selfie!

    39. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 11:02 am - Reply

      Fish 4 at 9:00 am

      • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 11:23 am - Reply

        George flew away leaving the fish.

        • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 11:27 am - Reply

          And then chick #1 was trying to eat it!! Made a great video even with the smudge on the lens.

          • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 1:56 pm - Reply

            Rub it in! You know you want to share! Com’oooonnnnnn!

    40. rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 11:00 am - Reply

      7-15-16 info I wanted share –
      Bones belonging to earlier Pandion species from the mid- to late-Miocene (approx. 13 million years ago) were found in California and Florida. These prehistoric osprey species were slightly less robust than modern ospreys, but otherwise very similar. (Poole, et al., 2002)
      Yeah Florida thats were I live!

      pic 4-8-16 G&G

    41. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 11:00 am - Reply

      Can we all say it together? aaawwwwwwwwwwww……..The chicks have been trying to find shade under various parts of Gracie.

    42. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:43 am - Reply

      Reply to L.C.Sylvester
      To place a picture on the comment board it must be in GIF, PNG, JPG, or JPEG format and you must have it saved already somewhere in your computer. Next click the button “choose file” under “post comment,” this will bring you to the files in your computer; then search for the picture you want to upload. When you’ve found the correct one, click on it and it will get uploaded to post on OspreyZone.

      L.C.Sylvester July 15, 2016 at 7:01 am – Reply
      The system here for placing a comment or pic is just terrible!! I do not know how you all do it..when I try it tells me that my comment/photo is a duplicate-which it is not…a horrible set-up here.

      • Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:45 am - Reply

        Oh, I see you’ve already figured it out.

        L.C.Sylvester July 15, 2016 at 7:03 am – Reply
        Lil bit getting fed this morning..7-15-16@7amEDT

    43. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:31 am - Reply

      Mantling Definition:
      (verb) The action of hunching or arching shoulders and spreading wings over a recent kill to conceal it from other birds and predators who would be potential thieves. In this posture, the wings are mostly spread and drooped to the ground, exposing the bird’s upper back, also called the mantle, which gives the action its name. The head is usually bent down to feed, and the tail is often spread to provide additional cover and counterbalance.

      Many birds of prey practice mantling after a kill. While they are feeding on the ground, particularly in open fields, rocky ground or similar areas with less shelter or cover to provide natural concealment, they are more exposed, and their instinct is to cover their prey and keep it out of sight so it is not stolen by a larger, more powerful apex predator. While mantling, the feeding birds may exhibit other nervous behavior including frequent looks at the surrounding area to scan for intruders or shuffling feet to continually readjust the mantling cover to disrupt views from different directions.
      http://birding.about.com/od/birdingglossary/g/Mantling.htm

      This is a picture from 7/14/2016 at 14:32 of Gracie mantling.

    44. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:15 am - Reply

      Reply sera
      Yes, it’s a picture of an albatross. George and Gracie are osprey.

      sera July 14, 2016 at 5:25 pm – Reply
      Sorry the image was not supposed to be posted, can you remove it thank you.

    45. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:13 am - Reply

      Reply to CarolV
      Maybe they’ll remove it

      CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:27 am – Reply
      OH. Wrong picture..Sorry!!!!!! Hate to take up space unnecessarily

    46. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:10 am - Reply

      Reply to rose
      OspreyZone was having trouble with the lens cleaner. I don’t know if it has been resolved … it doesn’t seem to have been.

      rose July 15, 2016 at 6:18 am – Reply
      Did the poop cleaning machine break !!!

    47. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:08 am - Reply

      Reply to Paula
      Thank you for the compliment. But it was time consuming for me to do the videos. Pictures are so so much easier … takes about 3 seconds at the most.

      Paula July 15, 2016 at 9:23 am – Reply
      Hi All,

      Betsy I am very sorry that you will not be posting your video’s and pictures anymore, I really enjoyed them. I certainly understand you frustration in not have any comments or replies because while I have not posted pictures or videos I have asked quite a few questions from people who I readily admit know much more about Osprey’s than I do and I have never received not one answer. I have also noticed the same from other people as well, they ask basically the same question as I have and I look to see if there is an answer to their question and still nothing. It can be quite frustrating!

      Thanks,
      Have a Great Day!

    48. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 10:06 am - Reply

      Reply yo maryann
      Thank you for the compliment. But it was time consuming for me to do the videos. Pictures are so so much easier … takes about 3 seconds at the most.

      maryann July 15, 2016 at 9:20 am – Reply
      Dear Betsy & Rjoneal & all others providing pics/fish counts/observations – I for one would be lost without you all. For those times I can’t watch, and wonder how the feeding went for the little one, your comments fill the void. All of us share a love for these birds (even the bullies!), and are so amazed at the survival instincts of the little one, and how far it has come.
      Without your comments, we would be missing so much info! Thank-you for the time you put into this, know it is all a labor of love.

    49. rjoneal July 15, 2016 at 10:04 am - Reply

      7-15-16
      Good Morning Osprey Family
      picture George with the 1st fish of the morning flying in !

    50. GinaM July 15, 2016 at 10:01 am - Reply

      It’s going to be very, very hot and uncomfortable today. I can only imagine what it will be like for our family way up high in that nest.
      This morning I watched Rocky doing his/her best impression of Gracie calling for food. And one of the older chicks is sneezing a lot- I can relate! The pollen count and air quality are very bad and I am sneezing too.

      More afternoon T-Storms are predicted, where they land, no one knows. Maybe they will cool off our babies.

    51. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 9:59 am - Reply

      Fish 3 at 8:10 am

    52. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 9:43 am - Reply

      Fish 2 at 6:31 am

    53. Pattye July 15, 2016 at 9:42 am - Reply

      I have also been on this site since last year but don’t comment that often. I read every one of your comments & rely on them since I’m not always able to connect to my computer. I feel that our Osprey Family is tight knit with many people reading & keeping up with it but also not always able to be on a computer. Please keep it up your comments. They are truly appreciated.

    54. Paula July 15, 2016 at 9:23 am - Reply

      Hi All,

      Betsy I am very sorry that you will not be posting your video’s and pictures anymore, I really enjoyed them. I certainly understand you frustration in not have any comments or replies because while I have not posted pictures or videos I have asked quite a few questions from people who I readily admit know much more about Osprey’s than I do and I have never received not one answer. I have also noticed the same from other people as well, they ask basically the same question as I have and I look to see if there is an answer to their question and still nothing. It can be quite frustrating!

      Thanks,
      Have a Great Day!

      • Monica July 15, 2016 at 2:51 pm - Reply

        Hello osprey lovers!!

        Paula – I haven’t been able to log on in a couple of days. But, I do agree with you. I’ve asked the ‘experts’ questions and thus far have not received any responses, especially lately.

        Betsy – thanks for always answering whatever questioned I’ve posed to you. So, you’re not going to be posting any videos? I love your videos, your funny commentaries even more. lol Oh, and love the way you explain things.

        I hope the lens gets cleaned soon. It’s difficult to enjoy viewing the nest when one can’t really tell who’s who. 🙁

    55. maryann July 15, 2016 at 9:20 am - Reply

      Dear Betsy & Rjoneal & all others providing pics/fish counts/observations – I for one would be lost without you all. For those times I can’t watch, and wonder how the feeding went for the little one, your comments fill the void. All of us share a love for these birds (even the bullies!), and are so amazed at the survival instincts of the little one, and how far it has come.
      Without your comments, we would be missing so much info! Thank-you for the time you put into this, know it is all a labor of love.

    56. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 9:19 am - Reply

      fish 1 at 5:20 am

    57. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 9:18 am - Reply

      #4- While Gracie is still serving last one!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 9:20 am - Reply

        A Biggie tried self feeding..you can figure out who…..

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 9:24 am - Reply

          ‘Til Gracie took over, followed by Trey, who had been eating on left-side, before Gracie switched tables.
          Is it a photo bomb to pop in front of picture? Someone’s getting a close up!

          • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 9:26 am - Reply

            Is he sticking his tongue out at us?

    58. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:51 am - Reply

      8:28a.m. Our Biggies rarely have close-ups, except for ID purposes. Admitted favoritism…..
      I think I know who this is, but I’m unreliable in better circumstances. SSOOOOOOOOOOOOO——A Biggie

      • Betsy October 19, 2016 at 11:00 pm - Reply

        CarolV: Here it is, October — make that OCTOBER — and I am going back through the comments to look for pictures that I want to copy and keep and re-reading comments. This is Brutus. 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀 I haven’t even finished organizing my hodge-podge of pictures and I’m adding more!!!!!!!!!!! 😀 😀 😀

    59. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 8:32 am - Reply

      7/15

    60. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:23 am - Reply

      Go,George! #3 !!!!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:24 am - Reply

        Helping beaks…..

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 8:29 am - Reply

          Trey is counting every mouthful! Do birds salivate> Pavlov response ? She found things to occupy herself-flapping-and stayed out of the way.

      • Karen DeLong July 15, 2016 at 10:57 am - Reply

        WOW! Our boy is a busy one this morning! Go George!!

    61. Betsy July 15, 2016 at 8:18 am - Reply

      7/15 am

    62. DarDar July 15, 2016 at 7:40 am - Reply

      Fri am 5:20 Littliest first one up and to the fish. 15 small bites or so by itself and then 1&2 decided to eat and well back off till later little one.Whole fish came in first thing. I don’t know how many viewers saw 1&2 last night with a tug of war with a big piece of fish. One of them tried to take it out of the mouth of the other and Tug-of-war. I thought it was very funny.

    63. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:25 am - Reply

      Trey at the early feed from fish @ 5:20am. Easy to recognize by that poor beat up head!

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:27 am - Reply

        OH. Wrong picture..Sorry!!!!!! Hate to take up space unnecessarily

    64. L.C.Sylvester July 15, 2016 at 7:03 am - Reply

      Lil bit getting fed this morning..7-15-16@7amEDT

    65. L.C.Sylvester July 15, 2016 at 7:01 am - Reply

      The system here for placing a comment or pic is just terrible!! I do not know how you all do it..when I try it tells me that my comment/photo is a duplicate-which it is not…a horrible set-up here.

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 11:10 am - Reply

        Same way you get to Carnagie Hall…Practice, practice, practice…JK-You made it !

    66. CarolV July 15, 2016 at 6:57 am - Reply

      5:20amEDT- George brought in a fish
      6:31am- George brought in a 2nd one.

      • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:30 am - Reply

        Trey at early feeding

        • CarolV July 15, 2016 at 7:33 am - Reply

          Trey, well fed at the second feeding, multi-tasks….poops in mid feed and makes room to continue eating

    67. Louise July 15, 2016 at 6:56 am - Reply

      Lil Bit getting fed this morning…Not a very clear pic-but clear enough to see.

    68. Marguerite Iannone July 15, 2016 at 6:54 am - Reply

      Wow!! Two big fish from George already this morning. Our little one is holding his/her own during these most recent feedings. He has not been attached. It’s more like he does have a seat at the table. He has eaten as much as his/her siblings this morning. Yea GEORGE!! I just love seeing him swoop in with those fish. Love Osprey Zone xoxo

    69. rose July 15, 2016 at 6:18 am - Reply

      Did the poop cleaning machine break !!!

    70. JP(K) July 14, 2016 at 11:22 pm - Reply

      If its okay with the admins at Osprey Zone, I came upon this amazing video on Facebook of osprey banding that happened in NJ on July 9th. Comparing those chicks to OspreyZones, I notice some similarities, the chicks at banding time are the age that OZ’s chicks are now. Comments about feistiness of chick no. 3, some prior mantling issues with the male parent… https://www.facebook.com/wildlifenj/ If the link only takes you to the top of the page, scroll down to July 9th, the title is Osprey Banding at LBIF. OZ camera, in my opinion, is the the best Osprey view I’ve seen so far(even with the washer on the fritz), but this video is really cool Very up close and personal, as well as informative. Something to watch while we await a rainstorm from the south.
      https://www.facebook.com/wildlifenj/

      • Shar July 15, 2016 at 1:37 pm - Reply

        Thank you so much for posting the link, I watched the video – amazing!

    71. Monica July 14, 2016 at 10:35 pm - Reply

      Hello All,

      I’m just logging on now, 10:30pm ET. Between my schedule and storms and power being out, I haven’t been able to view. So, is the lens still dirty?! What is this thing called ‘mantling’ that I just saw? I guess I need to catch up on all the comments. I learned something new each and every time I log on to this site. 🙂

      • Dorothy July 15, 2016 at 12:30 pm - Reply

        Mantling is a protective move I have observed over food, over incoming food of even a posture with incoming intruders. Gracie is the first parent I’ve seen do it as I have only observed the older chicks and juveniles mantling.

    72. DarDar July 14, 2016 at 8:51 pm - Reply

      At 7:35 pm Thurs Littliest went toe to toe eating with #2 they were both really scraping food from Mom in high speed mode. Little may pay for it later but he/she sure held its own on this feeding.

    73. CarolV July 14, 2016 at 8:15 pm - Reply

      8:14pm..Gracie and Mini-G protesting…need more fish?

      • CarolV July 14, 2016 at 8:41 pm - Reply

        8:36pm…George arrived empty clawed and Gracie gave him an earful. Coming storm disturbing fishing? He has been bringing in a fish late every night.

      • CarolV July 14, 2016 at 9:11 pm - Reply

        Looks like t-storms broke up before they worked out here on the Island. Sounds like NJ and in Brooklyn, near NYC, got hit hard in spots. So much for our free window washing……But that’s OK since hail was involved in these storms !

    74. SYLVIA July 14, 2016 at 8:01 pm - Reply

      7:59 pm and our little one has had only a very few mouthfulls from two fish. Pig biggies were determined to eat everything even when they were already stuffed. I really hope dad brings in one more fish for this one as am now afraid with this trend there will be a big downhill slide with this heat too.

      • SYLVIA July 14, 2016 at 8:34 pm - Reply

        Gracie appears to be very tired and hungry besides little one being hungry. She has snoozed several times, and called and called for food. Where is George? Hope he is ok. Hope he brings in a late fish as the sun sets.

        • SYLVIA July 14, 2016 at 8:36 pm - Reply

          20:37 George returned, no fish and both mom and baby trey are fussing.

    75. GinaM July 14, 2016 at 7:56 pm - Reply

      It must be a year of threes. A nest near me, on the Eastern North Shore of Nassau county, has three heads looking up at mom. Looks like all is well in that nest too!

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