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Osprey Rescue

Tommy Aprea - Windsong Osprey Nest

Tip:  If the nest is empty, use the red scroll bar to rewind the stream up to 12 hours

June 15th, 2020: Two eggs in the nest. Mostly sunny this week.

Please be advised that nature can be brutal – viewer discretion is advised.
Best viewed with Google Chrome.

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Special Thanks to Tommy and Christina: George & Gracie’s Landlords

Belle’s Journey

Written by Dr. Rob Bierregaard & Illustrated by Kate Garchinsky

Take flight with Belle, an osprey born on Martha’s Vineyard as she learns to fly and migrates for the first time to Brazil and back–a journey of more than 8,000 miles.

Click HERE for more information!

IMPORTANT: Messages from osprey experts

Rob Bierregaard July 1, 2015 at 7:24 am
I haven’t seen the little guy yet this morning, but I would be very surprised if he survived the night. That sure was tough to watch yesterday, but that whole process is as much a part of the essence of being an Osprey as is eating a fish. It’s part of the life of Ospreys that was rarely seen before we started putting cameras in nests. As hard as it is, we should not label the behavior as mean or cruel. Being mean or cruel implies that there is intent to do harm just for harm’s sake. Those young were responding to a set of stimuli (very little food being delivered to the nest and the presence of a very small young) in a way that evolution has hard-wired into them. It helps ensure their survival. Nature is not cruel. It is harsh, unforgiving, and often random (had the little guy been born 1st, he would have been just as aggressive as was his sibling), but not cruel or mean.

4818eecc88292926c58414a82c884c71Paul Henry ospreyzone July 1, 2015 at 8:17 am
Thanks Rob for bringing your knowledge and experience to help us all gain perspective here. We are all saddened by the events that unfolded before our eyes and it’s only natural for all of us to feel and express our emotions appropriately. There have been many issues pertaining to intervention which have been discussed amongst us all. There is no doubt in my mind that the right decision was made, to let nature take it’s course. By the way, that doesn’t equate to heartless, on the contrary, nobody feels worse about this then the apparent decision makers. I say apparent, because when all was said and done, and all the issues were properly weighed, there really weren’t any other options. It was clearly pointed out, by experts, that intervening at this stage could have spooked the whole nest to the point of losing all the young. If the little one was saved, and nursed back to health, what kind of a life would it have had, perhaps caged up in a zoo. I remember when I was younger I saw a golden eagle in captivity, caged behind a wire mesh. I could practically see it’s tears. As far as placing the little one in another nest, such a low probability of success would never have justified the possibility of spooking the nest. There’s a piece of me, however heavy hearted, that believes that perhaps it is better to be born free and die free. We mourn for the little one as we marvel at the wonders of nature.

Reprinted with the permission of John W. Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Hello Paul,

Thanks for your query, and you have my admiration for persevering. We know very well how tough your job is, including dealing with an anxious public.

Our policy with our Bird Cams project is essentially “just say no” to pleas for interference. The behavior you are witnessing – while seemingly cruel and heartless to us – is natural for many kinds of birds, especially those that feed on variable, unpredictable food supplies. The little nestling does have a chance to survive, but if it does not then that result was “meant to be” by the nature of Osprey breeding strategy. The wonderful things about these nest cameras also sometimes yield the difficult things for us to watch. As you might know, we actually post a “siblicide alert” on some of our cams where we suspect the possibility exists.

I’m copying your note to Charles Eldermire, project leader for our Bird Cams. He may have some additional comments, and he would be the one to ask if we might be able to use your stored files for biological analysis.

Best wishes, and good luck,

John W. Fitzpatrick

Director, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

In addition, Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of Ornithology Writes:

It’s also important to acknowledge that intervening can also cause problems of its own—depending on the ages of the birds in the nest, disturbing them can trigger an early fledge. We have restricted the scenarios in which we would even consider intervening to injuries or dangers that are explicitly human-derived. For example, 3 or 4 years ago we were alerted by viewers that one of the osprey chicks at the Hellgate Osprey nest was entangled in monofilament line. We consulted with our partners there (wildlife biologists, raptor researchers, raptor rehabbers) to determine if the monofilament was an issue, and if intervening was both likely to solve the issue AND not have bad effects on the other nestlings. In the end, a quick trip to the nest was scheduled via a bucket truck, the monofilament was removed, and the nestlings all eventually fledged. In that case, all of the permits were already in hand to be studying the ospreys, and we had already discussed how to approach issues in the nest.

Good luck to the young one—hope it all turns out well.

charles.

*******************
Charles Eldermire
Bird Cams Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Paul,

I’ve been to your site—great cam! And I noticed the runt in the nest. This is just normal Osprey reproduction. It happens all the time and you should not intervene. It’s tough to watch, but it’s how nature works. Ospreys almost always lay 3 eggs and on average fledge between 1 and 1.5 young each year. They stagger the hatch so there is a spread of ages in the young. That way, if food is short, the first-hatched (and therefore largest) will get enough food to survive while the smaller nest mates do not. If all three young were the same size and there was only enough food for 1 young, none of the young would get enough food and they would all die. If there’s lots of food, the smallest will eventually get fed and can survive. These nest cams can show some gut-wrenching scenes. The most infamous perhaps was one of the very first Osprey cams (on Long Island somewhere), where the smallest young died. One of the adults carried it out of the nest and after several minutes flew back into the nest and fed it to the other young. Waste-not-want-not at its goriest. At Hog Island up in Maine just last week a Bald Eagle came in and took the young out of the nest. Last year at another nest, cameras documented a Great-horned Owl taking young Ospreys out of a nest in NJ or MD. All of these things have been going on for millions of years and Ospreys are doing fine.

Rob Bierregaard
Academy of Natural Sciences
Drexel University
http://www.ospreytrax.com

    44,085 Comments

    1. Carol June 30, 2015 at 7:38 am - Reply

      Peewee likes exploring to the edges of the nest. He did that yesterday, too. Makes me nervous.

      • Debbie June 30, 2015 at 10:32 am - Reply

        Lots of positive energy and love to this family!

    2. Carol June 30, 2015 at 7:32 am - Reply

      Glad to see Peewee getting some exercise while the bros are still down. Almost shot poop on brother’s head, which would have served him right! Not to be judgmental!!

      • June B June 30, 2015 at 8:44 am - Reply

        Almost doesn’t count Carol. He’s got to aim better. LOL. Mom got hit yesterday by one of the larger chicks right in the face.

    3. Carol June 30, 2015 at 7:23 am - Reply

      I’ve been trying to identify who’s who. When you can see the chest, Gracie has some brown flecks, which I read most female osprey do. On the head, George’s brown spot is separated from his beak by a slight white margin. Gracie’s brown spot touches the beak. Aside from the poop line on her wing and being slightly larger(which is hard to distinguish), can anyone else point out any distinguishing marks?

      • Linda June 30, 2015 at 8:19 am - Reply

        Yes George has striped tail feathers and is much larger than Gracie. Tail feathers are slightly longer

    4. ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 9:55 pm - Reply

      Tonight is the first time I’ve been able to see the nest and Ospreys from the moonlight and the full moon isn’t till July 2. Really Majestic and beautiful.

    5. Karen June 29, 2015 at 9:39 pm - Reply

      Just started watching this today and I must say I find myself yelling “Feed the little one MORE!!” and “Stop picking on your brother!”. I’m so concerned for little Pip…

      • Stephanie June 30, 2015 at 6:58 am - Reply

        You and me both

    6. Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 9:14 pm - Reply

      At what point or age will these birds be able to “fly the coop”? There is no way the “little one” will be able to leave when the other two do. What happens then? I mean he/she may not survive long enough, but what if he/she does?

    7. Redkayak June 29, 2015 at 9:03 pm - Reply

      The moonlit nights are breathtaking.

    8. rebecca b June 29, 2015 at 8:26 pm - Reply

      It has been great watching these birds since they all hatched, but it is hard seeing the little guy get beat up by the other siblings. Its really crazy he/she is only half if not less then half the size of the other two. At least mom is still sitting on him/her. I believe he/she will survive. He is still getting food and still growing too. He is finally brown like the other two. Still routing for #3.

      • Linda June 29, 2015 at 9:33 pm - Reply

        Glad Dad keeping them warm. Especially the little one. Hoping he survived the terrible attacks from the siblings today. I hope he/she sleeps in and eats after the other two. They are so aggressive biting him, fear for his life. Don’t like to see him suffer like this. I know its nature but…..#3 has may prayers and wishes.

    9. gamma June 29, 2015 at 7:57 pm - Reply

      Is there anyone out there that knows what kind of fish are in this area that the Osprey are eating ? Just curious. I live on the West Coast.

      • Lady2Di4 June 29, 2015 at 8:49 pm - Reply

        It’s hard to tell but from the size and shape I’d guess what we call locally “bunker”, I think the proper name is Menhaden.

      • Redkayak June 29, 2015 at 8:58 pm - Reply

        Hi fluke and bass are running right now.

      • Sheryl June 29, 2015 at 10:04 pm - Reply

        He is catching mostly bunker (Atlantic Menhaden) and I have seen him bring in at least two black fish.

        Fluke are bottom dwellers, George gets his fish from the top. Bass are generally large (they eat the bunker). It is possible he can catch a small bass, but I have not seen him bring any to the nest. Even a small bass would be much larger than a large bunker or black fish. You’d know it right away if he caught one.

        • Sheryl June 29, 2015 at 10:13 pm - Reply

          Correction: black fish are also bottom dwellers. George would catch it in a shallow area.

    10. Rose Petejan June 29, 2015 at 7:29 pm - Reply

      George’s talons were tangled in the mesh when he left and took it with him. Has he been back since? Do you think he’s still stuck in it?

      • DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 8:33 pm - Reply

        George dropped the netting over the water and returned a short while later to the nest. He’s just fine!

        • susan June 30, 2015 at 9:00 am - Reply

          So glad to hear that! There was nothing in NATURE about that net! Thanks f0r the update!

    11. cloudymoor June 29, 2015 at 6:51 pm - Reply

      I’m really dreading that first feeding tomorrow morning. They’re all going to up at the same time and it will be hard for the little guy to wait his turn, but wait he must–preferably on the other side of the nest and bid his time.

      • Moe June 29, 2015 at 7:58 pm - Reply

        This has really bothered me. I’ve been watching Eagle nests for years. Never seen this aggression,yes beat downs but nothing comparative. I have really enjoyed this site until today. Good luck Osprey family,I’m out.

      • Trinity June 29, 2015 at 8:25 pm - Reply

        The little Pip continues to persevere against all odds, let’s continue to root for the runt ! It’s definitely been another roller coaster day of viewing.

      • Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 9:32 pm - Reply

        Me too, I’m not sure I want to watch.

    12. IRJ June 29, 2015 at 6:12 pm - Reply

      Warms my heart to see Gracie brooding over #3 quite a bit this early evening. Granted, Thing 1 and Thing 2 are pretty much past the point of being easily brood-able, but with everything the little guy puts up with, it’s nice to see a mother’s care in some small way. 🙂

      • GinaM June 29, 2015 at 6:30 pm - Reply

        Is Peanut underneath Gracie and is he/she ok? When I last left the big one was really attacking Peanut.

        • LAJ June 29, 2015 at 6:44 pm - Reply

          Last I saw, Peanut was under mom. It’s brutal seeing him getting beat up by both big siblings. 🙁

      • Michael Martin June 29, 2015 at 7:05 pm - Reply

        To All, I observe quite abit.especially at feeding time If you watch the interaction amongst all the siblings you will notice that there is a social order in the nest. I notice at feedings the Alpha chick will feed first will the other larger sibling watches and waits for there turn. And among the two larger chicks the Alpha will peck at the other, and sometimes quite very aggressively. But the wee one will position himself as far away from the others thus he will feign sleep thus avoiding any and all confrontation. As far as pecking of the smaller chick, yes in may seem brutal but it seems in an odd perspective very gentle and less traumatic to the Wee Un. Just watch with an open mind and yes it may seem oxymoronic ” A Cruel Kindness”

        • Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 9:36 pm - Reply

          I don’t see that happening at each feeding. To me it looks like the little guy, after getting pecked, is actually passed out. By the time he/she gets up, the others have finished feeding & hopefully he/she gets some food.

    13. DJ June 29, 2015 at 5:44 pm - Reply

      The Ospreycoaster keeps on keeping on. I’ve found such highs and lows day after day. I’m an optimist and I’m still rooting for the little bit. Gracie lovingly gathering only him/her under her was heartwarming..

      • Ahimsagrl June 30, 2015 at 10:08 am - Reply

        Right

    14. DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 5:30 pm - Reply

      About 5:30pm, the little one was vocalizing a lot as Gracie was cleaning and adjusting the nest so she walked over and is now brooding him. The other 2 are out on their own. A little extra TLC from Mom for our special guy!

      • EMILY COLE June 29, 2015 at 6:48 pm - Reply

        I was looking for the little one and hope he’s under Mom

    15. cloudymoor June 29, 2015 at 5:27 pm - Reply

      Oh my! Gracie actually did her business IN the nest instead of shooting it outside of the nest. I haven’t seen that yet. And one of her chicks got her earlier on her right wing I believe.

    16. JB June 29, 2015 at 5:09 pm - Reply

      No one likes seeing SIBLICIDE, which as we’ve seen from our experts is part of avian life for millions of years. We’ve not had the ability to watch it in real time until the last few years. So, I for one cringe when I see it. My natural intuition makes me wonder why the parents don’t step in and deal with the obvious desire to fulfill the story of Cain and Able, which is why they used to call it: Cainism. I cannot wrap my logical arms and my sympathetic heart around the fact that chick number three may likely be killed in the next several hours. But yet, it is what happens in the real world animal communities. They don’t have legislature or laws forcing ways to behave upon them. They do what they do and no human has yet learned to speak or understand Osprey.

      • JB June 29, 2015 at 5:17 pm - Reply

        🙁 🙁 🙁

        Hard….

    17. cloudymoor June 29, 2015 at 5:01 pm - Reply

      At around 5PM it’s quite clear that one of the older chicks, given a choice between eating and beating up on the little one, is choosing the latter.

      • GinaM June 29, 2015 at 5:06 pm - Reply

        I think you are right. He sees him as prey. Maybe the fact that the little one is bleeding is causing the big one to go in for the “kill”
        I don’t think I can watch this. I am glad I got to see the little one have such a loving peaceful time with both parents doting on him.

      • Ahimsagrl June 29, 2015 at 5:17 pm - Reply

        Horrible!

      • Ahimsagrl June 29, 2015 at 5:30 pm - Reply

        Awe Pee Wee snuggling under mombrella. Seems extremely windy.

      • Annette June 29, 2015 at 5:41 pm - Reply

        This last feeding was just brutal for the little one. Both of the other brutes mangled him very badly. Tore at his head numerous times. I saw the previous feeding and the reason that he did not open his mouth for food even though Mom was trying to shove it in, looked to me like he was terrified! How he is going to survive is really going to be a miracle. If I was close by I would like nothing better than to try and save this chick.

    18. DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 4:47 pm - Reply

      Ahh, Gracie is feeding George with the little one between them. Bonding! So sweet!

    19. Cloudymoor June 29, 2015 at 4:39 pm - Reply

      A truly inspiring feeding session for #3. Indeed he had to wait for the siblings from hell to be asleep. I saw a solid 10 minutes at LEAST of uninterrupted feeding. Finally one of the others awoke and I guess it was number 2 because he was allowing it to eat for several minutes and then oddly, attacked number 3 when receiving food himself. Tuned in again at around 4:30 to see another private feeding session and miracle of miracles, he actually was refusing the food, in spite of quite an effort from Gracie to get him to eat it. If George could continue to pick up the pace, he may be ok. I refuse to give up on him.

      • GinaM June 29, 2015 at 4:51 pm - Reply

        Watching both mom and dad feed peanut is heartwarming. They are good parents!

      • DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 4:51 pm - Reply

        I agree with you Cloudymoor, we should not give up on this little one! I do believe in miracles and this little guy has great spirit!

    20. DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 4:39 pm - Reply

      About 4:25pm, I think the wee one is stuffed! Gracie keeps trying to give him more food and he’s not taking anymore. That’s a good sign I would think. I love these private moments he has with Gracie. He is quietly chirping away at her as she picks up around him, still trying to give him more food. I hope now he can nap in peace and get his strength up and grow some more! BTW, there was a time during the feeding where he was eating WITH one of his bigger sibs, I think #2, without her beating him up. Well, for a while anyway. A little bit of progress there.

    21. Merry June 29, 2015 at 4:35 pm - Reply

      Around 4:32 Gracie was trying her best to get Pee Wee to eat. It was as if she was saying come on, this is your chance!

    22. suzanne June 29, 2015 at 4:33 pm - Reply

      i see Gracie trying to feed baby/runt but it doesn’t open its beak. She pushes it against the babys beak but baby wont open up. Gracie such a good Mamma. I just read George got tangled up. Praying he is safe. Bless this sweet family.

    23. Diane June 29, 2015 at 4:29 pm - Reply

      Even though I know that this is “survival of the fittest” and all that, it doesn’t make it any less heartbreaking to watch. Gracie had a fish, the 2 big ones were far away from the little one, and Gracie ate the fish without giving any to the little guy, as it was looking at her & waiting to be fed. So sad.

      • Diane June 29, 2015 at 4:31 pm - Reply

        Gracie is actually trying to feed the little one, and the little one won’t take the fish. The 2 bigger ones are far away & it is a perfect opportunity for the little one to eat. I wonder if it is already too weakened…………….

        • DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 5:34 pm - Reply

          Never fear Diane, the reason the little one wasn’t eating at that point was that he was stuffed! He got a great meal from both Gracie and George.

      • Monica June 29, 2015 at 5:03 pm - Reply

        Yes, I was watching that. Just a few minutes ago George & Gracie were feeding each other. The little runt was near them; the two bullies were sleeping. And neither one fed the little runt. When one of the bullies woke, immediately George gave him food. And the bully started pecking the little guy. It is so sad. I’m praying for that little guy. 🙁

    24. Jara June 29, 2015 at 4:25 pm - Reply

      Had to stop watching this afternoon. The little one was so weak it looked like the end. Then a fish arrived and momma was feeding the baby as fast as she could before the others noticed. At one point she gave him such a large piece I though he’d choke. One of the big ones woke up and came over. She hasn’t attacked him yet. So far so good.

      • Michael Martin June 29, 2015 at 4:36 pm - Reply

        At 4:18 the little one had a real good feed. You would not believe the chunks of fish she was devouring, it would have choked a horse. And the best part was that one of her Siblings was perched next to her and left her alone and she never backed down. She is one tough Cookie

    25. Merry June 29, 2015 at 4:19 pm - Reply

      Pee Wee seems to be pretty smart. He (she) waits until everyone is done then moves in. When they start to beat him up he turns around and puts his head down. GO PEE WEE!!

    26. rajojomanik June 29, 2015 at 4:14 pm - Reply

      I’ve been watching the feed off and on today and it’s sad that the little guy gets picked on even when it’s not meal time.

      He’s a fighter… at about 4pm EST he is finally getting fed with and has the undivided attention of Gracie while the two are sleeping.

    27. DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 4:13 pm - Reply

      At about 4:05pm, the wee one started chatting up a storm with Gracie as the other two slept. Hurray for Gracie, she’s feeding him as he keeps asking for “more please”! I think George may be sitting on the camera because I can see his shadow and hear him chirping, perhaps defending against possible intruders. Amazing…where this little one gets the strength to do all that calling to Mom is beyond me and a testament to his drive! He’s eating well!

    28. Linda Kay June 29, 2015 at 3:54 pm - Reply

      The Baby held her own this feeding cycle. I think she is learning to play possum , still taking alot of beating’s though ! Just when you think she’s down for the count that proud little head rises from the ashes ( Like the Pheonix) with her little puffed up chest ! Said a prayer for her today !! She was fed by George & Gracie. Keep her in your prayers tonight !!

      • DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 4:43 pm - Reply

        Phoenix would be a great name for him should he survive, which I’m praying he will. He’s amazing!

    29. BostonBean June 29, 2015 at 3:43 pm - Reply

      That big fish just laying there. Everyone with full bellies except the little one and he’s far from the fish. Come on little guy, your spirit of perserverance serves you well. Get on over there!

    30. DebbieDritz June 29, 2015 at 3:41 pm - Reply

      George came back to the nest with a big stick and sans the netting so he’s fine!

      It has been a rough eating session but #3 did get some food both from Gracie and George (about 3:15pm). The beatings are taking their toll, he seems pretty tired, but he keeps fighting! They punch him down, mostly #1 it appears, but he keeps getting up. He is one heck of a fighter! There’s still fish left, hoping he gets even more when his sib goes into a food coma. He may be small, he may not survive, but he’s giving it his all! You gotta love him!

    31. Phil Kelsey June 29, 2015 at 3:32 pm - Reply

      The siblingcide stuff is fought to watch. It will be a slow death for the little guy. Feel like I am watching the Animal Planet version of Game of Thrones!!!

    32. Elaine June 29, 2015 at 3:31 pm - Reply

      Gracie just pulled the remainder of the fish over to herself while George was feeding PeeWee. But, wait a moment, George left and Gracie is now feeding PeeWee. I am so glad the netting is gone. I think the parents know what they are doing now.

    33. nancy June 29, 2015 at 3:29 pm - Reply

      Hope the bully gets his due process in time. The baby bird is almost dead. This isn’t right by any stretch.

      • JC June 29, 2015 at 6:24 pm - Reply

        It is the way of Nature.

    34. JC June 29, 2015 at 3:25 pm - Reply

      Pray that the little one’s suffering will end sooner rather than later. 🙁

    35. Carol June 29, 2015 at 3:24 pm - Reply

      Just saw Dad feeding Peewee after big guys chased him away from Mom! Every little bite helps!

    36. Linda June 29, 2015 at 3:21 pm - Reply

      Yay! Pee wee is eating again!

      • Linda June 29, 2015 at 3:22 pm - Reply

        I spoke too soon. Poor little baby.

    37. Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 3:17 pm - Reply

      Relentless attack on the little one by both of the other ones at the same time during the 3:00 feeding. This may be the end for the little one.

    38. emilie June 29, 2015 at 3:16 pm - Reply

      YAY George!!!! He took off with half his lunch and took that mesh netting with him…I hope it’s not caught on his talons. But YAY!! it’s gone!!
      I do like the green sea grass addition too!

    39. Brad June 29, 2015 at 3:13 pm - Reply

      George returns! And, with food!! ( :

    40. Carol June 29, 2015 at 3:13 pm - Reply

      People keep writing off the little guy but he keeps rallying! (and I can hear George is back! With more fish no less!) Peewee’s slowly getting stronger but the issue seems to be the big guys stay awake longer! We can all pull for him. As someone once said “it ain’t over till it’s over!”

    41. maryjo June 29, 2015 at 3:04 pm - Reply

      Wow! George went to fly off with a partial fish and the green net went with him!!!

    42. Carol June 29, 2015 at 2:56 pm - Reply

      Anxiously waiting for George’s return! It looked like he got free of that netting down near the water and then rose back up but I couldn’t see clearly at that distance. So many worried about the babies and the netting, who knew George would get caught? Does anyone else get a message about humans and our garbage? That wasn’t the only trash in the nest.

      • Judy June 29, 2015 at 4:50 pm - Reply

        This was so cute.. George came with another fish..So he gave some to the baby, & he feed Gracie.. This was just priceless..to see.. The two parents with the baby between them..

    43. Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 2:54 pm - Reply

      Does any one k ow if the little one got to eat at this last.feeding? I see he’s sitting there now by himself with the other 2 away from.him. I wish the parent word feed the little one now.

      • Jessica June 29, 2015 at 3:21 pm - Reply

        Getting fed now.

      • Linda June 29, 2015 at 3:22 pm - Reply

        The little one got to eat a little. The sibling is brutal. The baby was looking for food a little earlier but daddy didn’t seem to notice. While feeding, the baby was attacked and dad did nothing. The baby is eating some now but doesn’t seem to know what to do with the food. Lets keep our fingers crossed.

      • Judy June 29, 2015 at 3:54 pm - Reply

        Yes I saw the father come with a small piece of fish..He feed the little one .. It was about t3:15..He didn’t get much..he waited for 15 min. For the Mother to feed him..For some reason she let him sit there..He is at the very edge ,I hope he turned around..I was glad that Geprge took the green mess..

      • EMILY COLE June 29, 2015 at 4:00 pm - Reply

        He got a few bites of food before each of the bigger ones attacked him now he seems weak and there is still fish on the nest

      • June B June 29, 2015 at 4:14 pm - Reply

        Littlest one getting fed @ 4:15. Mom is feeding him exclusively while other 2 are napping.

      • kgerette June 29, 2015 at 4:30 pm - Reply

        Peewee getting fed as we speak !

      • Kathy June 29, 2015 at 4:32 pm - Reply

        I’m watching right now at 4:31 and she/he’s trying to feed the little one, but it won’t take much. :'(

      • Christine June 29, 2015 at 4:32 pm - Reply

        She has been trying to feed the little one but he’s not taking any food. The two are away from him right now.

    44. Brad June 29, 2015 at 2:37 pm - Reply

      Wow! Scary watching George take off with the netting that was in the nest stuck to his talon’s.Gracie watched him with a very concerned look the whole time he was flying around after he took off. Hope he’s OK!

    45. Heather June 29, 2015 at 2:35 pm - Reply

      Well, George just pulled that mesh right out of the nest. Way to go, Dad! Now if only he would save Little Bitty Birdy One… :’-(

    46. IRJ June 29, 2015 at 2:35 pm - Reply

      So (what I think was by happy-accident), George flew out of the nest around 2:30PM WITH the mesh. Hooray!

      • Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 4:48 pm - Reply

        I saw that as well. Hope he doesnt get tangled up in it or bring it back

    47. kim boston June 29, 2015 at 2:27 pm - Reply

      This is a cruel, horrible, torturous death. He has been bullied for days and from what I can see, no reason. The other 2 are eating plenty. WHY does he have to die this way.

      • JB June 29, 2015 at 3:06 pm - Reply

        Paul has invested a lot of time and effort to provide the most comprehensive information available on earth today about why this happens, and why human beings need to keep their noses out of it. Please take the time to read the posts Paul has made regarding this topic. There is nothing more that anyone can add to replies from these noted Osprey professionals.

        • Patty June 29, 2015 at 7:38 pm - Reply

          JB, totally agree with you,thank you, Paul, so very much for the comprehensive, professional information about this !!! p.s. Do you have to take a chill pill to stand us?!xoxo
          Cannot believe my eyes, the biggies are allowing Momma to feed Pee Wee along with them!!!!

    48. sapphie June 29, 2015 at 2:26 pm - Reply

      it’s been a brutal day for the little one. I don’t see it making it through til tomorrow.

      • Jon June 29, 2015 at 3:02 pm - Reply

        I think the chick may be dying, not sure though.

      • Trinity June 29, 2015 at 3:08 pm - Reply

        Little Pip is getting a private feeding session @ 3:10 pm

      • EMILY COLE June 29, 2015 at 6:42 pm - Reply

        He got a few bites of food before each of the bigger ones attacked him now he seems weak and there is still fish on the nest The wind is so strong why doesn’t the mother cover the little one as he can fit under her

    49. ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 1:27 pm - Reply

      In regards to intervention:

      Paul

      I’ve been to your site—great cam! And I noticed the runt in the nest. This is just normal Osprey reproduction. It happens all the time and you should not intervene. It’s tough to watch, but it’s how nature works. Ospreys almost always lay 3 eggs and on average fledge between 1 and 1.5 young each year. They stagger the hatch so there is a spread of ages in the young. That way, if food is short, the first-hatched (and therefore largest) will get enough food to survive while the smaller nest mates do not. If all three young were the same size and there was only enough food for 1 young, none of the young would get enough food and they would all die. If there’s lots of food, the smallest will eventually get fed and can survive. These nest cams can show some gut-wrenching scenes. The most infamous perhaps was one of the very first Osprey cams (on Long Island somewhere), where the smallest young died. One of the adults carried it out of the nest and after several minutes flew back into the nest and fed it to the other young. Waste-not-want-not at its goriest. At Hog Island up in Maine just last week a Bald Eagle came in and took the young out of the nest. Last year at another nest, cameras documented a Great-horned Owl taking young Ospreys out of a nest in NJ or MD. All of these things have been going on for millions of years and Ospreys are doing fine.

      Rob Bierregaard
      Academy of Natural Sciences
      Drexel University
      http://www.ospreytrax.com

      • Jim June 29, 2015 at 4:01 pm - Reply

        Thanks for the comments Rob. I have noticed a lot of comments about the plight of the little one. Although it is heart wrenching, it is nature at work. Let’s focus on the well being (and beauty) of the surviving members of this osprey family.

    50. Debra June 29, 2015 at 12:42 pm - Reply

      I spoke too soon … I think one of the older birds killed the runt! It looks like his neck is broken … I’m sick now.

      • Cindy June 29, 2015 at 2:06 pm - Reply

        Why is the one so little? Why won’t the mom feed it?

        • Cindy June 29, 2015 at 2:08 pm - Reply

          it’s still alive. Quiet a fighter, but so sad to see them beating it up. 🙁

          • Jon June 29, 2015 at 2:54 pm - Reply

            All this time wasted while the bigger ones sleep she could of fed the little one, how sad.

      • Cindy June 29, 2015 at 2:22 pm - Reply

        That one is going to kill the small chick.

      • bean June 29, 2015 at 2:39 pm - Reply

        George landed on the nrt and took off with it stuck on his foot hope it falls off

      • Jessica June 29, 2015 at 2:44 pm - Reply

        The runt is moving around. Not eating well though.

      • Renee June 29, 2015 at 2:51 pm - Reply

        Just when you think the little one cannot go on, he or she pops up their head and keeps hanging in there. For whatever its worth, thank you for this opportunity to look at nature in the raw. I realize you have now invested a great deal of time and effort on this project and never thought it would blossom into this ! Its hard to put it all into perspective but these birds now are a part of all of us. Lets keep hanging in there and hoping for the best !

      • Lynn Cutler June 29, 2015 at 2:55 pm - Reply

        NO, no, no, he is fine honey, this baby will be very smart & strong, i have seen this time & time again in the bald eagles nest all of the time, this lil guy isn’t stupid, none of em r,,, give it time honey

      • Debbie June 29, 2015 at 3:09 pm - Reply

        There we go! Baby is getting some food!!!!

    51. Dawn June 29, 2015 at 12:26 pm - Reply

      I feel like I’m watching an episode of “Mutual of Omaha” Poor Pee Wee… 🙁

    52. gamma June 29, 2015 at 12:24 pm - Reply

      Have the comments been turned off ? None of my questions or comments are showing up.

    53. maryjo June 29, 2015 at 12:18 pm - Reply

      Paul, so happy to see that you’ve consulted with Cornell. They are top-notch and actually, pretty close to you. I was wondering if you’ve considered a facebook page for the nest. With the positioning of the camera, I have scapped some great shots! It may be a way to share both photos and comments, although not a chat, as some have requested. Thanks again.

      • ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 1:57 pm - Reply

        Thanks for the comment. We are unsure if we will set up a facebook page yet, as there are positives and negatives.

    54. Debra June 29, 2015 at 12:17 pm - Reply

      It just makes my heart glad to see the little runt standing and flapping his little wings! He is just so cute … hang in there little one!

    55. gamma June 29, 2015 at 11:52 am - Reply

      Is this camera totally stationary or can it be moved around for different views ?

    56. Jennifer June 29, 2015 at 11:44 am - Reply

      Hang in there baby #3 you little tough guy….

    57. LAJ June 29, 2015 at 11:33 am - Reply

      Has the wee one passed? He/she doesn’t seem to be breathing, and hasn’t moved in quite some time… 🙁

    58. JB June 29, 2015 at 10:51 am - Reply

      I think it’s time to announce a SIBLICIDE WATCH on Gracie and George’s nest.

    59. Phil Kelsey June 29, 2015 at 10:36 am - Reply

      I agree (not that my opinion matters)!! Intervening in any way is inappropriate. These are not domestic “pets”. We are witnessing nature taking its course. Nature is not subject to “human” rules and can be very cruel. I completely understand we feel for this family and wish for the perfect outcome. We just need to sit back and marvel at what we see.

    60. Carol June 29, 2015 at 10:32 am - Reply

      I’ve been observing the nest on the tower near King Kullen parking lot for about 5 seasons. watching from below, speculating what was happening, I was invested in the success each year that we got to see the fledglings learning to fly. The past two summers have been unsuccessful years. There appears to be hopeful activity in that nest, so watching this nest gives me some idea what is going on high above us. I really appreciate this viewpoint, difficult as some may be to watch. Thank you for this.

    61. Rose Petejan June 29, 2015 at 10:25 am - Reply

      It’s really windy, are you expecting another storm?

      • ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 1:50 pm - Reply

        We might have a storm on thursday, but it gets windy here quite often

    62. ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 10:23 am - Reply

      In addition, Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of Ornithology Writes:

      It’s also important to acknowledge that intervening can also cause problems of its own—depending on the ages of the birds in the nest, disturbing them can trigger an early fledge. We have restricted the scenarios in which we would even consider intervening to injuries or dangers that are explicitly human-derived. For example, 3 or 4 years ago we were alerted by viewers that one of the osprey chicks at the Hellgate Osprey nest was entangled in monofilament line. We consulted with our partners there (wildlife biologists, raptor researchers, raptor rehabbers) to determine if the monofilament was an issue, and if intervening was both likely to solve the issue AND not have bad effects on the other nestlings. In the end, a quick trip to the nest was scheduled via a bucket truck, the monofilament was removed, and the nestlings all eventually fledged. In that case, all of the permits were already in hand to be studying the ospreys, and we had already discussed how to approach issues in the nest.

      Good luck to the young one—hope it all turns out well.

      charles.

      *******************
      Charles Eldermire
      Bird Cams Project Leader
      Cornell Lab of Ornithology

      • patty June 29, 2015 at 11:09 am - Reply

        Uh oh, looks like Maisey has netting around her neck.

        • patty June 29, 2015 at 11:42 am - Reply

          OK! Looked like when she was napping her head was in a hole of the netting, looks ok now-whew…

      • Sheli Barden June 29, 2015 at 11:44 am - Reply

        as i am watching one of the chicks is gotten some of the green netting wrapped around its neck.. now if that continues to be a problem because it is a man made item would you be able to itervene to untangle the chick and remove it?

      • Felicia June 29, 2015 at 12:00 pm - Reply

        Thank you for the opportunity to watch these birds. This is nature, so whatever happens would be happening whether or not we are watching. While it may be difficult to watch for some, we can’t impose our human emotions onto these animals. When it gets tough to watch, I turn it off.

      • Michael G. Martin June 29, 2015 at 12:09 pm - Reply

        Tommy
        Without giving out the exact location of the nest can you get me an approximation on where it is located and is it on the Peconic Bay side of Southold and is it close to the Cornell Co-op
        For about 10 years now I’ve been tracking about four osprey Nests and I track there hunting patters. I’m wondering what range the Male has for fishing and his Territtorial Boundaries
        Any help would be greatly appreciated
        Michael G. Martin

      • will June 29, 2015 at 12:46 pm - Reply

        That is how it goes down in the real world of mother nature. Survival of the fittest. I do not like it but I understand it. You want the strongest and hardiest osprey to pass on their genes to their offspring. I hope the little fella survives but that is in the hands of mother nature and more importantly God.

      • Vibra June 29, 2015 at 1:23 pm - Reply

        I, m surprised. The littel one still alive ?? He/ she was , can`t find words , ( hurting ) many times, this morning. ( Norwegian time ). Get no Fish,the littel –

      • patty June 29, 2015 at 2:33 pm - Reply

        Gmmmmeorge just flew away with the netting on his talon- good or bad? h

        • patty June 29, 2015 at 3:12 pm - Reply

          oops, so sorry for the type, but it was a good thing because he came back with no nettin And a fish!

    63. Brad June 29, 2015 at 10:07 am - Reply

      Thanks for that post, Paul. Hope it will help ease much concern over how nature takes it’s course with the different species which we humans share the planet with.

    64. Jara June 29, 2015 at 10:00 am - Reply

      So hard to watch the little one get beat up during feeding time. But after the other two had enough, he finally got to eat and is now sleeping under mom. Hang in there baby.

    65. cloudymoor June 29, 2015 at 9:53 am - Reply

      Well I saw that first feeding and it was of course brutal to see. Number 3 basically curled up in a ball and even then, was being attacked. Provided enough fish is delivered his best hope seems to be, mom feeds the older two and when they’re sleepy, hope another fish delivery where he can eat. It’s happened this morning and hopefully will happen again and again. He IS feisty.

    66. Marilyn June 29, 2015 at 9:49 am - Reply

      Finally, some much deserved alone feeding time for the little one. Hope the other 2 stAy asleep long enough.

    67. Redkayak June 29, 2015 at 9:48 am - Reply

      9:35 am tuned it to find a fish tail and the two older pips asleep so as Pip Swueak was up alert and getting a personal feeding. My connection blurred but I did see at least 4 good mouthfuls. Maybe even more. Still a contender. I’m not counting the runt out yet!

    68. Jon June 29, 2015 at 9:48 am - Reply

      I’m surprised one of the older chicks watched as the little one was being fed without beating up on him and than the other chick found out and beat up on him, sad but at least he just ate and his crop looks full.

    69. ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 9:36 am - Reply

      Reprinted with the permission of John W. Fitzpatrick, Executive Director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

      Hello Paul,

      Thanks for your query, and you have my admiration for persevering. We know very well how tough your job is, including dealing with an anxious public.

      Our policy with our Bird Cams project is essentially “just say no” to pleas for interference. The behavior you are witnessing – while seemingly cruel and heartless to us – is natural for many kinds of birds, especially those that feed on variable, unpredictable food supplies. The little nestling does have a chance to survive, but if it does not then that result was “meant to be” by the nature of Osprey breeding strategy. The wonderful things about these nest cameras also sometimes yield the difficult things for us to watch. As you might know, we actually post a “siblicide alert” on some of our cams where we suspect the possibility exists.

      I’m copying your note to Charles Eldermire, project leader for our Bird Cams. He may have some additional comments, and he would be the one to ask if we might be able to use your stored files for biological analysis.

      Best wishes, and good luck,

      John W. Fitzpatrick

      Director, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

      • Jan Klinedinst June 29, 2015 at 9:52 am - Reply

        Excellent post! What will be, will be in nature and has been so for thousands of years. Birds are not human. Birds are not bullies, they survive in ways we may not understand or like. But, such is life and always will be for these magnificent birds! Thank you for your time creating this site and tending it every day.

      • GinaM June 29, 2015 at 9:56 am - Reply

        Thank you for sharing this letter. Nature must be permitted to do what it does without our interference. Earlier this morning I saw Peanut give up and let the big ones eat everything. I thought that was the last I would see of him. Then, just a few minutes ago, I watched as he and mom enjoyed a fish together while the others slept. He ate a lot! I believe in him and think he will make it. I hope so!

      • Sue June 29, 2015 at 10:00 am - Reply

        Excellent letter! Thank you for sharing it with us. I have only been following this site for a few days but have been very impressed with the set up you have here– high def camera and four hour rewind. Awesome! Sorry the situation with the little one has put a damper on things this season, but it happens. I really appreciate the kindness and tolerance you have shown in dealing with it.

      • JB June 29, 2015 at 10:19 am - Reply

        Thank you Paul, and also thanks to John Fitzpatrick for providing this opportunity to the public. John’s letter explains the reality of life very well and how we should respect it.

      • Patty June 29, 2015 at 4:17 pm - Reply

        Cannot believe my eyes, the biggies are allowing Momma to feed Pee Wee along with them!!!!

    70. Misty June 29, 2015 at 9:19 am - Reply

      Pee wee is eating really good this morning!!!

      • Kgerette June 29, 2015 at 9:32 am - Reply

        He didn’t get fed the first round. This is the second round.

        • gordon June 29, 2015 at 10:15 am - Reply

          That would have been at least the third feed of the day. There were two really fish brought back really early.

      • Kgerette June 29, 2015 at 9:35 am - Reply

        He’s been eating for like 10 min ! Go little one! Get strong!

      • kim boston June 29, 2015 at 12:25 pm - Reply

        They are NOW attacking him, it’s heartbreaking to watch.

      • Kathy June 29, 2015 at 12:39 pm - Reply

        Thank you for the comment Misty. I saw earlier, he got nothing. Glad to hear he got fed.

      • LC June 29, 2015 at 12:40 pm - Reply

        A few times we see one egg in the nest doesnt hatch, how I wish this would have been one of those times.
        He has a good crop and a good slice but I think he may have just taken his last beating.
        Looks like he is running out of time. 🙁

      • LC June 29, 2015 at 12:50 pm - Reply

        Seriously? No being real on this board? 🙁

        • ospreyzone June 29, 2015 at 2:17 pm - Reply

          Please forgive our response time as we can’t monitor and moderate constantly.

      • Judy June 29, 2015 at 12:55 pm - Reply

        The little guy now has a cut on top of his head..He is still getting picked on when he his trying to eat..Also they getting at him every time he picks up he head..& there is no food…
        He is walking around a little more..Hope you will make it little one,we all are routing for you…Hang in there…

    71. Bonnie June 29, 2015 at 8:45 am - Reply

      After they jump how do they get back to their nest? If they can’t are they on their own?

      It would be great to have a pointer directly to the bottom to post.

    72. Donna June 29, 2015 at 8:34 am - Reply

      Many have mentioned that there isn’t enough food and that is why the runt is being beaten up so badly. I don’t believe that. Gracie feeds the two older ones until they are bursting at the seams. They even pass out at times. But as soon as the littlest one moves he’s being beaten down. George brings in a fish about every 3-4 hrs. That will hopefully change now that they are getting bigger. Up to this point it isn’t because there isn’t enough food. If they are fed until they can no longer take any more food and there is still fish left over, it’s not because there isn’t enough food.

      • Gamma June 29, 2015 at 10:10 am - Reply

        Donna, I agree with you 100%. I only pop in occasionally through out the day , which I just did and watched the male fly off with fish left over. I commented on this yesterday also. I feel they are not experienced parents. Because I can not sit and watch this nest all day I don’t know how much is not being eaten or how much the little one is eating.

    73. Judy June 29, 2015 at 8:33 am - Reply

      My heart is breaking for our little one…I pray that his suffering will end soon.

    74. JB June 29, 2015 at 7:52 am - Reply

      There appears to be a large gash on the top of RUNT’s head.

    75. PHIL KELSEY June 29, 2015 at 7:35 am - Reply

      VERY SAD. LOOKS LIKE THE LITTLE GUY WILL NOT MAKE IT. HOWEVER, THIS IS NATURE IN PLAY. BETTER CHANCE OF THE OTHER 2 SURVIVING.

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